THOMAS A. MARTIN
Attorney-at-Law
The Law Offices of Thomas A. Martin represents clients throughout Southeast Texas, including the cities of Houston, Galveston, Memorial, River Oaks, West University,
Clear Lake, League City, Sugar Land, Pearland, Beaumont, Hempstead, Katy, Conroe, and all the communities in Brazoria, Chambers, Fort Bend,
Galveston, Grimes, Harris, Jefferson, Liberty, Matagorda, Montgomery, Polk, San Jacinto, Trinity, Walker, Waller and Wharton Counties.
The Law Offices of Thomas A. Martin represents individuals facing serious felony charges in both state and federal trial and appellate courts. We represent people facing felony charges from drugs to murder, and have developed an emphasis on sex crimes (both adult and child offenses).

In our commercial litigation practice, we represent small business owners facing "bet the business" litigation prospects if the opposing side wins.

With our family law practice, we cherish the opportunity to represent parents, especially fathers, who need a divorce and want to keep or get custody of their kids.
WHEN IS AN ARREST WARRANT ISSUED?

Usually a warrant is required before you can be taken into custody from your home. But, you can be arrested at home without a warrant if fast action is needed to prevent you escaping, destroying evidence, endangering someone's life, or seriously damaging property.

The warrant must be signed by a magistrate or judge, who must have good reason to believe that you, whom the warrant names, committed the crime. If your name is unknown, "John Doe" be used on the warrant - along with your description.

Once an arrest warrant is issued, any law enforcement officer in the state can arrest you - even if the officer does not have a copy of the warrant. Generally, there is no time limit on using a warrant to make an arrest.

Before entering your home, a law enforcement officer must knock and identify himself or herself and tell you that you are going to be arrested. If you refuse to open the door - or there is another good reason - the officer can break through a door or a window.

If the police have an arrest warrant, you should be allowed to see it. If they don't have it with them, you should be allowed to see it as soon as practically possible.

The police may search the area within your reach. If you are arrested outdoors, they may not search your home or car.

Resisting an arrest or detention is a crime. If you resist an arrest, you can be charged with a misdemeanor or felony in addition to the crime for which you are being arrested. If you resist, an officer can use force to overcome your resistance or prevent your escape. The officer can even use deadly force if it appears you will use force to cause great bodily injury.